Immigration FAQs

Update on Status of Executive Order
For Students
For Departments
For Employees
Responses to Immigration Enforcement
Allies and Supporters of UO’s Global Community


Update on Status of January 27, 2017  Immigration Executive Order

The US Presidential Executive Order of January 27, 2017 blocked entry to the US for 90 days by people from Iraq, Syria, Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan and Yemen, barred all refugees for 120 days, and indefinitely halted refugees from Syria.

On February 3, Judge James Robart of US District Court in Seattle issued a Temporary Restraining Order order preventing implementation of key elements of the executive order, including the seven country ban.  The US presidential administration subsequently appealed this decision to the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals.

On Thursday, February 9, a three judge panel of the Ninth Circuit Court rejected the administration’s appeal, ensuring that the seven country travel ban and other elements of the January 27 executive order remain temporarily blocked.

For the time being, people from the seven targeted countries who already hold valid visas may enter the US.  Issuance of new US visas in these seven countries remains uncertain.

After threatening to appeal the Ninth Circuit decision, the presidential administration now seems to be preparing a replacement executive order that will more narrowly restrict issuance of new visas from selected countries, while also, it seems, permitting travel by permanent residents originally from the targeted countries.

The UO continues to monitor this fluid and troubling situation closely, and will share up to date information as soon as we have it.

For Students

Q: If I am a UO student, faculty or staff member from one of the seven countries targeted by the January 28, 2017, executive order on immigration (Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, or Yemen), and I am currently a resident in the US, is it okay for me to travel outside the US?

A: We recommend you do not travel outside the US during the period of the current 90-day ban on arrivals into the US from the seven targeted countries, through April 27, 2017. Thereafter, there is not yet clarity on how rules may change, so we suggest you consult closely with the international student support team at the UO as this complex and fluid situation evolves.

Q: If I’m from one the seven countries targeted by the January 27, 2017, executive order and I can’t travel outside the US for the foreseeable future, what can the UO do to help so this does not negatively affect my academic progress, career plans, or personal life?

A: For academic progress issues, International Student and Scholar Services (ISSS) and the Office of Academic Affairs have established a committee of faculty members and department heads from units with the largest number of students from the targeted countries. Please contact ISSS director Abe Schafermeyer, abe@uoregon.edu or 541-346-1215, who will refer you to that committee, which will work with you on a case-by-case basis to find solutions to academic progress delays resulting from the January 27, 2017, executive order.

For career concerns, please contact ISSS director Abe Schafermeyer, abe@uoregon.edu or 541-346-1215. We have limited emergency support funds and work-study positions set aside for students affected by the January 27, 2017, executive order.

Q: Does the UO support undocumented and Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) students?

A: We have heard from numerous students, faculty and staff members that they are concerned about potential changes to immigration laws, especially as it relates to undocumented students and those covered under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals policy. We want to be very clear that we support all UO students, regardless of their immigration status.

While it is too soon to speculate on what may happen in the future, the University of Oregon remains committed to the DACA policy and providing an inclusive campus that values global citizenship and engagement. International students, scholars, and faculty members as well as undocumented and DACA students continue to be protected by the same privacy laws and university policies as US citizens.

The UO has appointed Dr. Jane Irungu, assistant vice president for student engagement, to serve as campus point person in support of undocumented and DACA students.  Irungu can be reached at 541-346-4464 or jirungu@uoregon.edu.

Q. What information is available about the BRIDGE Act?

A. Senators Lindsey Graham (R-SC) and Dick Durbin (D-IL) and Reps. Mike Coffman (R-CO) and Louis Gutierrez (D-IL) have introduced this bipartisan legislation in Congress that would allow people who are eligible for or who have received work authorization and temporary relief from deportation through DACA to continue living in the US with permission from the federal government. You can find additional information in a Q and A format at https://www.nilc.org/issues/daca/faq-bridge-act/.

Q: Where do I go with questions about support for undocumented students and community members on campus?

A: The university has created an administrative position within the Division of Student Life that will be a point of contact. Jane Irungu, assistant vice president for student engagement, will serve as the University of Oregon’s point of contact and resource for those covered under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program. Irungu can be reached at 541-346-4464 or jirungu@uoregon.edu.

Q: I am an international student planning to study abroad. Is that still possible?

A: Yes, all international students are welcome to study abroad through Global Education Oregon (GEO, the UO’s study-abroad office). We will closely monitor immigration policy before and during your stay abroad. If you are from one of the seven countries mentioned in the recent executive order, we recommend you do not travel outside the US during the period of the current 90-day ban on arrivals into the US from the seven targeted countries, through April 27, 2017. Thereafter, there is not yet clarity on how rules may change, so we suggest you consult closely with the international support team at the UO as this complex and fluid situation evolves.

If you have specific questions or concerns about your ability to study abroad, please contact Tom Bogenschild, executive director of Global Education Oregon, tombogen@uoregon.edu or 541-346-4911.

Q: As a student, where do I go with additional questions?

A: International students can contact Abe Schafermeyer, director of International Student and Scholar Services, abe@uoregon.edu or 541-346-1215.


For Departments

Q: What do I do if an immigration enforcement official requests information about a UO student, employee, or visiting scholar?

A: The UO Office of the General Counsel is the point of first contact for law enforcement officials seeking information about a UO community member. Contact the general counsel at 541-346-3082 or gcounsel@uoregon.edu.

The Immigration Legal Resource Center, an independent immigration rights nonprofit organization, has available on its website legal rights red cards, which anyone can print out and give to an immigration enforcement official to succinctly assert one’s rights in written form.

On November 16, 2016, the UO issued this statement to campus on these issues:

As is currently our practice, we will treat all students equally in keeping with our values of inclusion, diversity, and equity. This also means 

  • the University of Oregon will not facilitate immigration enforcement on our campus without a warrant or a clear demonstration of exigent circumstances such as the imminent risk to the health or safety of others
  • the University of Oregon Police Department will not act on behalf of federal officials in enforcing immigration laws
  • the University of Oregon will not share with the federal government any information on the immigration status of students unless required by court order

Q: My unit is about to admit a student from one of the targeted countries. What should we do?

A: A few UO academic units are about to admit graduate students from the seven targeted countries. We also have undergraduate applicants and potential American English Institute applicants from these countries. We will work to maintain the academic integrity of the admissions process (seek and welcome the best candidates, with an eye toward equity and inclusion), while also acknowledging that the UO cannot control the issuance of US entry visas at embassies and consulates abroad. We will signal willingness to work with these newly admitted students and applicants, on a case-by-case basis, to explore every option available as we gain more clarity on visa policies to follow the 90-day ban.

The following language has been approved by the Office of the General Counsel for use in admissions communications:

Please note that the new US administration is reviewing immigration policies and visa rules, with changes underway or expected. Already a 90-day ban has been placed on new visas for citizens of Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, or Yemen. After this 90-day ban, we can only speculate on new visa policies. Thus, while our offer of admission represents our earnest desire for you to join our intellectual community here at the University of Oregon, this is always contingent on each admitted student successfully obtaining a visa to enter the US. Should visas from your country be suspended, we ask you to be in touch directly with the school or department you have been admitted to and decide on a possible course of action for your specific student.

Possible admissions actions or recourse in case a US ban affects applicants from a specific country (all actions approved by the UO general counsel):

a) Deferred admission
b) Defer admission until a later date, after which the student may need to reapply to a given program
c) Talk with an international advisor or the UO general counsel about your situation. Rules and regulations will likely evolve and become clearer under the new administration
d) Arrange for the student to reapply to a program in the next admissions cycle

Q: My unit is expecting a visiting scholar or guest lecturer from one of the seven countries targeted by the executive order. Will they still be able to come?

A: We recommend postponing any visits from scholars from the seven targeted countries during the period of the current 90-day ban, through April 27, 2017. Thereafter, there is not yet clarity on how rules may change, so we suggest you consult closely with the international support team at the UO.

Q: Are there ways for UO faculty to signal they are supportive of students who may be struggling with these changes?

A: While UO rules prohibit use of public resources (UO email, websites, fora, etc) for advocacy of a personal political stance or support for a particular candidate, we can certainly express support for students who feel anxiety and stress as immigration rules change. This is a normal part of the advising and mentoring function of faculty.

Each student faces unique circumstances, so face to face listening is a powerful supportive strategy.

Please refer students to campus resources designed to support them, such as the ones listed below.

Many UO faculty are interested in being part of a national statement of support for concerned students, such as can be found at We Stand With Our Students set up by UCLA colleagues.

Finally, a small but simple gesture of support might include placing this Multilingual Welcome Poster for your office door, or other public spaces. High quality printed copies available by contacting the Office of International Affairs at intl@uoregon.edu or calling 541-346-3206.

Q: Where do I go with questions about international student, faculty, visiting scholar, or employee concerns and support?

A:  General questions about international policies and programs at the UO can be directed to Vice Provost Dennis Galvan in the Office of International Affairs, dgalvan@uoregon.edu or 541-346-5851.

International students can contact Abe Schafermeyer, director of International Student and Scholar Services, abe@uoregon.edu or 541-346-1215.

Visiting scholars can contact Kate Comiskey, international scholar advisor, comiskk@uoregon.edu or 541-346-5573.

International employees can contact Jennifer Doreen, international employment specialist, jdoreen@uoregon.edu or 541-346-2638.

DACA students should contact Jane Irungu, assistant vice president of student engagement, jirungu@uoregon.edu or (541) 346-4464.


For Employees (Faculty and Staff)

Q: I am an employee who was born in one of the seven targeted countries. What impact does the executive order have on me?

A: If you have already entered the US, the travel ban does not affect your ability to remain in the US and work at the UO; however, if you were to leave the US, you may have difficulty reentering. Before traveling outside the US, you should consult with international human resources to get an update on the status of reentry issues: Jennifer Doreen, international employment specialist, at jdoreen@uoregon.edu or 541-346-2638.

Q: What resources will the UO provide if I am unable to travel due to the recent immigration changes?

A: The UO administration will look into what resources can be provided on a case-by case-basis. UO employees whose travel is affected by the recent executive order are encouraged to contact Jennifer Doreen, international employment specialist, at jdoreen@uoregon.edu or 541-346-2638.

Q: I am an employee who is not from one of the seven targeted countries. Will the executive order affect my ability to travel?

A: If you are not from one of the seven targeted countries (Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, or Yemen), the 90-day ban on entry into the US does not affect you. However, the executive order did ask the Department of State to review the type and duration of visas that the US issues to citizens of each country. If the US limits the type of visas that it issues, the affected countries will likely reciprocate by limiting the type of visas that it will issue to US citizens traveling to that country.

Q: Where do I go with questions about international employee concerns and support?

A:  International employees can contact Jennifer Doreen, international employment specialist, at jdoreen@uoregon.edu or 541-346-2638.

Q: Are there ways for UO faculty to signal they are supportive of students who may be struggling with these changes?

A: While UO rules prohibit use of public resources (UO email, websites, fora, etc) for advocacy of a personal political stance or support for a particular candidate, we can certainly express support for students who feel anxiety and stress as immigration rules change. This is a normal part of the advising and mentoring function of faculty.

Each student faces unique circumstances, so face to face listening is a powerful supportive strategy.

Please refer students to campus resources designed to support them, such as the ones listed below:

  • Abe Schafermeyer, director of International Student and Scholar Services, abe@uoregon.edu or 541-346-1215.
  • Visiting scholars can contact Kate Comiskey, international scholar advisor, comiskk@uoregon.edu or 541-346-5573.
  • International employees can contact Jennifer Doreen, international employment specialist, jdoreen@uoregon.edu or 541-346-2638.
  • DACA students should contact Jane Irungu, assistant vice president of student engagement, jirungu@uoregon.edu or (541) 346-4464.

Many UO faculty are interested in being part of a national statement of support for concerned students, such as can be found at We Stand With Our Students set up by UCLA colleagues.

Finally, a small but simple gesture of support might include placing this Multilingual Welcome Poster for your office door, or other public spaces. High quality printed copies available by contacting the Office of International Affairs at intl@uoregon.edu or calling 541-346-3206.

Q: Where do I go with questions about international student, faculty, visiting scholar, or employee concerns and support?

A:  General questions about international policies and programs at the UO can be directed to Vice Provost Dennis Galvan in the Office of International Affairs, dgalvan@uoregon.edu or 541-346-5851.

International students can contact Abe Schafermeyer, director of International Student and Scholar Services, abe@uoregon.edu or 541-346-1215.

Visiting scholars can contact Kate Comiskey, international scholar advisor, comiskk@uoregon.edu or 541-346-5573.

International employees can contact Jennifer Doreen, international employment specialist, jdoreen@uoregon.edu or 541-346-2638.

DACA students should contact Jane Irungu, assistant vice president of student engagement, jirungu@uoregon.edu or (541) 346-4464.

For International Visiting Scholars

Q: I am a visiting scholar expecting to come to the University of Oregon. How will the recent executive actions affect my ability to come to Oregon?

A: We recommend postponing any visits from scholars from the seven targeted countries during the period of the current 90-day ban, through April 27, 2017. Visiting scholars from other countries are encouraged to proceed as planned. Because immigration rules may continue to change, we suggest you consult closely with Kate Comiskey, international scholar advisor, comiskk@uoregon.edu or 541-346-5573.

Q: Where do I go with questions about international visiting scholars?

A:  Visiting scholars can contact Kate Comiskey, international scholar advisor, comiskk@uoregon.edu or 541-346-5573.


Responses to Immigration Enforcement

Q: As a member of a UO unit, what do I do if an immigration enforcement official requests information about a UO student, employee, or visiting scholar?

A: The UO Office of the General Counsel is the point of first contact for law enforcement officials seeking information about a UO community member. Contact the general counsel at 541-346-3082 or gcounsel@uoregon.edu.

The Immigration Legal Resource Center, an independent immigration rights nonprofit organization, has available on its website legal rights red cards, which anyone can print out and give to an immigration enforcement official to succinctly assert one’s rights in written form.

On November 16, 2016, the UO issued this statement to campus on these issues: As is currently our practice, we will treat all students equally in keeping with our values of inclusion, diversity, and equity. This also means

  • the University of Oregon will not facilitate immigration enforcement on our campus without a warrant or a clear demonstration of exigent circumstances such as the imminent risk to the health or safety of others
  • the University of Oregon Police Department will not act on behalf of federal officials in enforcing immigration laws
  • the University of Oregon will not share with the federal government any information on the immigration status of students unless required by court order

Q: As an individual, what do I do if I am stopped or questioned by an immigration enforcement official about my immigration status in the US?

A: You have the right to remain silent and to speak to an attorney before you answer any questions by an immigration official. For more information about your rights, visit immigrationimpact.com/2016/11/10/know-rights-refresher-immigrants.

If you are contacted by law enforcement, you may want to contact an immigration attorney about your specific situation and concerns. The American Immigration Lawyers Association provides information about how to select an immigration attorney and a list of immigration attorneys www.ailalawyer.org.

The Immigration Legal Resource Center, an independent immigration rights nonprofit organization, has available on its website legal rights red cards, which anyone can print out and give to an immigration enforcement official to succinctly assert one’s rights in written form.

Q: Can the UO refer me to an immigration lawyer?

If you are contacted by law enforcement, you may want to contact an immigration attorney about your specific situation and concerns. The American Immigration Lawyers Association provides information on how to select an immigration attorney and a list of immigration attorneys: www.ailalawyer.org.


Allies and Supporters of UO’s Global Community

Q: There seems to be considerable confusion about the recent executive order and other changes to US immigration policy. Where should I look for updated information?

A: The UO is closely watching all executive and congressional actions that affect our students, faculty, staff, and visitors. Should the recent executive order be expanded or amplified in any way, we will notify the university community as soon as possible. We are closely reviewing the executive order—and its impact—and we will keep the campus community apprised of developments in a timely manner moving forward. Updates on the current situation can be found above.

Q: Is there an official UO statement in response to changing federal immigration rules since the January 2017 change of administration in the US?

A: Yes, in the most recent statement from President Michael Schill and Provost Scott Coltrane: “UO values global engagement and our international scholars.”

Q: How will federal immigration laws change and what is the University of Oregon’s role?

A: Although there have been some short-term executive orders from the Trump administration affecting immigration policies, it’s not yet clear how federal immigration laws and regulations will change on a long-term basis. As the president’s priorities related to immigration and globalization take shape, the UO will continue to be vigilant, active, and in close communication with the Oregon governor and our federal congressional delegation to protect the interests and rights of UO students, faculty, staff, and their families.

Q: What is the UO’s stance on immigration enforcement on campus and sharing immigration data with federal officials?

A: On November 16, 2016, the UO issued this statement to campus on these issues:

As is currently our practice, we will treat all students equally in keeping with our values of inclusion, diversity, and equity. This also means 

  • the University of Oregon will not facilitate immigration enforcement on our campus without a warrant or a clear demonstration of exigent circumstances such as the imminent risk to the health or safety of others
  • the University of Oregon Police Department will not act on behalf of federal officials in enforcing immigration laws
  • the University of Oregon will not share with the federal government any information on the immigration status of students unless required by court order

Q: Will the UO declare itself a sanctuary campus?

A: There is no common definition of a sanctuary city or campus. The university is committed to protecting student privacy, ensuring student safety, and supporting student success, and, as information develops, to creating effective solutions that benefit students. We also share the concern expressed by leaders at other universities about how such a designation may inadvertently harm undocumented students.

Q: Does the UO officially support global engagement?

A: Global engagement is a core part of the UO’s pursuit of academic excellence. This is woven, for example, into our Excellence Strategic Framework, which

  • refers to the UO as a “close-knit, human-scale academic community with global reach” (p. 3)
  • describes our purpose as educating “informed participants in the global community . . . [to] enhance the social, cultural, physical, and economic well-being of our students, Oregon, the nation, and the world” (p. 4)
  • commits us to “expose all undergraduate students to meaningful research experiences and global perspectives” (p. 7)
  • commits us to “enhance diversity and global reach by recruiting top international students” (p. 10)

The UO makes considerable investments in global engagement through the following avenues:

  • International Human Resources provides services to international employees and UO employees who are working or traveling outside of the US
  • International Student and Scholar Services welcomes students, manages visas, and works with many campus partners to ensure academic success and a culture of support for our international students and visiting colleagues
  • Global Education Oregon is a large study-abroad operation that sends 25 percent of each graduating class on a study-abroad experience and provides access to study abroad for 30 partner universities
  • GlobalWorks is a new UO-managed international internship program with placements in two dozen locations around the world
  • The Global Studies Institute supports the faculty with international research projects and centers, global publication and grant-making collaborations, and international programming on campus
  • The American English Institute provides intensive English preparation for hundreds of students a year, some of whom go on to matriculate at the UO and many of whom continue elsewhere, but who come to the UO because of the AEI’s global reputation for excellence

Q: Where do I go with questions about international student, faculty, visiting scholar, or employee concerns and support?

A:  General questions about international polices and programs at the UO can be directed to Vice Provost Dennis Galvan in the Office of International Affairs, dgalvan@uoregon.edu or 541-346-5851.